Lundy Island saved by generous government grant and fundraisers

The coronavirus pandemic caused visitor numbers to plummet with a resultant catastrophic decrease in income but the public stepped in and saved Lundy Island, a home to rare bird species of the Devon coast. In all, well-wishes raised £214,000 (source: The Times). The island is managed by the Landmark Trust which was awarded £500,000 of government funding (source: North Devon Gazette). I presume that this is in addition to the money raised by well-wishers?

Lundy

Lundy. Picture: Andrew Rayner.

The island had launched an appeal in August to urgently raise money to ensure the survival of the island beyond 2020. The general manager of Lundy, Derek Green, is obviously delighted with the grants as it will save jobs and ensure that the island stays open.

This grant will help protect all the jobs on the island and on the Oldenburg and those that work for us on the mainland. It will keep the island open and accessible to all our visitors in a safe manner as well, and some of the money will make the Oldenburg Covid-secure, as well as in the Marisco Tavern and the Lundy General Stores.

The “Oldenburg” is a British passenger ferry serving the island of Lundy in the Bristol Channel. Lundy Island is a famous place. It is about 3 miles long and 5/8 of a mile wide. It is known for its rich birdlife. It lies on a major migration route attracting many indigenous and vagrant species. In 2010 it became Britain’s first Marine Conservation Zone. Visitors come to the island by boat from Bideford or Ilfracombe. In winter they can fly there by helicopter from Hartland. It is the largest island in the Bristol Channel. It is 12 miles off the coast of Devon, England. In 2005 an opinion poll for the Radio Times named the island as Britain’s tenth greatest natural wonder.